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Driving smarter

Posted on August 21st, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Staff Sgt. Marko Shehovac’s diatribe against last week’s Jeers criticizing local RCMP for contributing to traffic delays over the long weekend (by working a speed trap at the top of the pass in Kootenay National Park and for not performing traffic control at the four-way stop in Radium) will likely evoke one of two responses from readers: a hearty chuckle (“Oh, that Marko”) or criticism for what’s perceived as behaviour unbefitting a RCMP staff sergeant. But whether you appreciate his humour or not, Mr. Shehovac has a …

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Doctor retention in rural B.C.

Posted on August 14th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
A new family doctor in Invermere is thanks to a provincial program that aims to ensure rural British Columbians have access to high quality care.
Dr. Karolina Maslowska, who is starting full-time hours at the Invermere Medical Clinic come September, is one of 14 internationally trained physicians to participate in the new Practice Ready Assessment pilot program.
According to a government press release, this group of 14 is the first to go through the program, in which doctors must undergo a rigourous assessment process, spending three months with …

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Campaign kick-off

Posted on August 7th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
The Conservatives conveniently timed padding pockets both locally (see page 10 for the most recent funding announcement) and across the country right before declaring the start of the most expensive campaign period in Canadian history. MP David Wilks’ gaffe when it came to overstating his recent TransCanada funding announcement by $32.6 million (akin to giving someone a birthday present then saying: “Well, I actually gave you two including last year’s”) most likely detracted from the overall effectiveness of this tactic. Nonetheless, money talks and now the race …

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Feed the fest frenzy

Posted on July 31st, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
If there’s any doubt as to what a music festival can bring to a small town in a rural area, one only has to look at the Pemberton Music Festival. Estimated to inject millions of dollars into the surrounding region, the festival attracts about 30,000 people to tiny Pemberton over a four-day period in the three years it’s been held. After the initial success of PembyFest in 2008 (the event was cancelled until 2014 and returned for the third time this July), nearby Squamish got in on …

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The party in power

Posted on July 24th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
MP David Wilks’ schedule had suddenly been filled with massive funding announcements — $44 million for Kootenay National Park, $156 for Trans-Canada Highway upgrades through Mount Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks and the enhanced Universal Child Care Benefit payments that will give families an additional $720 a year for each child aged six to 17… all made within the last week. Impressive, but questionable timing, with the federal election less than three months away.
Conspicuously absent from Mr. Wilks’ funding announcement for Kootenay National Park is any mention …

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Debate dissent

Posted on July 17th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
In Ancient Greece, generally considered the birthplace of Western civilization about 4,000 years ago, debate played a significant role in society. Possibly one of the longest standing traditions of democracy, debate is absolutely necessary in the political arena. It allows opposing sides to get their views across in the public realm without killing each other (which tends to be the practice in less democratic climates). Debating is key in Canadian Parliament and the provincial legislatures, where members debate proposed legislation and make resolutions that eventually become laws …

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Boys’ background explained

Posted on July 17th, 2015 by


Dear Editor:
The picture in the Historical Lens (July 10th) is of my two great uncles Harry and George Barbour. They were raised at Barbour’s Rock, which is on the Panorama hill road. My great grandfather hauled oar from the Mineral King Mine to Athalmer. Love the wagons made of explosive boxes.
Thank you for such a great free paper. Lovely to keep up on the valley.
Sincerely,
Ellen Bellamy
Carbon, AB

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Smoke and mirrors

Posted on July 10th, 2015 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Publisher
In British Columbia all municipal governments are required by law to produce a balanced budget. If cost overruns are incurred, the municipality has two years to rectify the situation. At the local level, every budgetary item is examined to determine if any cost savings can be recognized or if a tax increase is necessary. As a result, municipal budgets are extremely accurate documents.
At the provincial and federal level, no such laws exist. These governments can borrow money to cover cost overruns without having to raise taxes to …

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Are you second-class?

Posted on July 3rd, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
This Canada Day, many Canadians were out celebrating in usual Canadian style by camping, watching parades and fireworks, or just enjoying a brew and barbecue out on the backporch. But of the 35 million Canucks happy to pay their respects to the red and white maple leaf flag, many may have been feeling a little apprehensive, a little upset, or even just downright mad.
That’s because of a new federal law, passed last year but parts of which recently came into effect, that considers these Canadians citizens …

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Substantial history

Posted on June 26th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Some people in the valley can recall every step in the timeline that’s laid out on page 51 of this week’s Pioneer. But though this particular timeline starts in 1982, the history goes even further back to the 1970s when Grant Costello, a former Canadian ski racing coach, hatched the idea of a summer training ground for Canada’s national ski team in the Jumbo Valley area.
Now, as senior vice-president of Glacier Resorts Ltd., Mr. Costello is prepared to keep fighting for his dream — …

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Our village

Posted on June 19th, 2015 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Publisher
This coming week we join the families of our David Thompson Secondary School graduates in celebrating their achievement. It is a momentous time for the Class of 2015, and while families and siblings beam proudly as students cross the stage to receive their diplomas and effectively pass into adulthood, there are many community members outside the family that have shared and shaped our children’s journey.
Consider the coaches and other volunteers who have generously donated their time to ensure that our children could grow through sports such as …

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Senseless vigilante bear shooting

Posted on May 29th, 2015 by


Dealing with wildlife is part and parcel of living in the Upper Columbia Valley. Along with the spellbinding views, glimmering lakes and glorious fresh air comes deer eating garden flowers, skunks lurking under the back porch and the occasional bear ambling down the street looking for tasty garbage bins to raid.
And as long as there’s no threat to residents, or to their pets, these wildlife encounters should be no big deal. It may be nerve-racking to have a bear on the street, but bears are rarely aggressive if unprovoked.
All of …

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Representation

Posted on May 22nd, 2015 by


By Breanne Massey
Pioneer Staff
For 90 per cent of the population, provincially controlled legislation that does not allow First Nations to participate in regional district board meetings until the treaty process has been completed is just another headline about arbitrary decisions that the government has made to gain control.
But for people like Akisqnuk First Nation chief Lorne Shovar, who requested a seat at the Regional District of East Kootenay (RDEK) board of directors table to vote on community-based decisions within the region in March, it’s yet another historical clash that’s continued …

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Market mayhem

Posted on May 15th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Though rumours have swirled through the community for years, the news the Invermere Farmers’ Market is actually moving out of its long-term 6th Avenue location will still be greeted by dismay and disbelief.
The market, after years in the making, has become a downtown Invermere mainstay and as much of a local attraction as the quaint main street and nearby Kinsmen Beach. It’s no secret there’s been strife between the market and nearby businesses who have resented the honorary not-for-profit status granted by the District of Invermere while …

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Orange crush

Posted on May 8th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Leadership turnover happens in hockey all the time. Just look at the Canucks who hired coach John Tortorella to reignite the team, who was then promptly turfed a year later after the team failed to make the playoffs for the first time in six years under his direction.
But Canadians’ political patience tends to run much deeper. Here in B.C. the Liberals have won four elections and governed since 2001, (count ‘em — 14 years; 16 years by the next provincial election); the federal Conservatives have been in …

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A drawn out match

Posted on May 1st, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
The order for Glacier Resorts Ltd. (GRL) to cease construction on Jumbo Glacier Resort’s day lodge and service building locations has spiked speculation on both sides of the pro-Jumbo/anti-Jumbo debate.
What’s needed to rectify the situation and move the resort forward, according to the Manager of Compliance at the Environmental Assessment Office, is an amendment to the Environmental Assessment Certificate that would allow the structures to be located inside an avalanche hazard area, instead of “completely outside” as the current certificate stipulates. Even if Minister of Environment …

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Family business will be missed

Posted on April 24th, 2015 by


Dear Editor:
The Book Bar, a fixture in Invermere since my arrival in July of 1982, sadly is closing its doors in the very near future.
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the business for its support of the David Thompson Secondary School (DTSS) band program over all those years, whether it was for sponsoring our Most Improved Musician Award, selling our Big Band Dance tickets, and never hesitating to put up one of our posters.
A visit to The Book Bar was always an enjoyable part of …

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In this image, dated 1930, a horse-drawn cart, a dog and an old car are pictured in front of the Invermere Hardware store that was established by George Bennett and Frank Stockdale. If you have any more information, email us at info@columbiavalleypioneer.com. Photo (C724) courtesy of the Windermere District Historical Society

Heart of town

Posted on April 24th, 2015 by


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Rights under attack

Posted on April 24th, 2015 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Publisher
The constitutional rights guaranteed to all Canadian citizens are under attack by all levels of government.
At the federal level over the last six years, our Conservative government has lost no less than ten cases on constitutional grounds at the Supreme Court of Canada, this after the Harper government has appointed six of the nine sitting Justices. These violations include, according to the rulings of the SCoC, denying Aboriginal land claims and exercising illegal Senate reform. Provincially, here in B.C., our teachers have been subjected to thirteen …

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Alberta angst

Posted on April 17th, 2015 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Anyone wondering about the extent of the damage on the Albertan economy caused by the drop in oil prices only needs to read this week’s Your Money article to gain some understanding. This week’s column is unique in that it delves deeply into politics, turning up some surprising facts about the 2015 Alberta budget.
Alberta is expected to return to a deficit budget in 2015 because oil prices have fallen roughly 50 per cent since last summer, causing a $7 billion revenue shortfall — which, according to CBC …

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