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Graduation

Posted on June 23rd, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
Some view it as the end of a 13-year odyssey, others as a first step with many to come. All students should view this accomplishment, graduating from high school, with pride and honour regardless of what they have planned for the future.
Our graduates this year have once again received a world class education, with B.C. students having the best learning outcomes of any educational system in the English speaking world.
To the Class of 2017: Graduation is also a time that family members choose to impart wisdom and …

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Trap…and relocate

Posted on June 16th, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
“When the school is on the reserve, the child lives with its parents, who are savages, and though he may learn to read and write, his habits and training mode of thought are Indian. He is simply a savage who can read and write. It has been strongly impressed upon myself, as head of the Department, that Indian children should be withdrawn as much as possible from the parental influence, and the only way to do that would be to put them in central training industrial schools …

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Bear un-aware

Posted on June 9th, 2017 by


By Nikki Fredrikson
Pioneer Staff
The journalist part of me was intrigued when I found out that there was a bear roaming around CastleRock, but the animal lover in me knew immediately there could be no positive end to this story. When I read a Facebook post discussing the bear and its confidence to walk on back decks I had a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach knowing that this bear was destined to be destroyed.
While investigating the events that caused three black bears to be destroyed by local …

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Not quite over yet

Posted on June 2nd, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
The most recent provincial election in British Columbia is one for the history books. On Tuesday May 9th, the governing Liberals earned victory in 43 ridings across our province, with NDP candidates getting the nod from voters in 41 ridings and the Green Party earning three seats.
On most election nights the winning party is clear but not here. In B.C., it takes 44 seats to govern. Adding to the uncertainty was that three ridings had vote spreads of less than 200 between the winning and second place …

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CP Rail holds hostage

Posted on May 26th, 2017 by


By Lorene Keitch
Pioneer Staff
The town of Golden is looking to bypass CP Rail (CPR) in order to access the Kicking Horse River.
This decision comes after more than a year of negotiations with the rail company to allow rafters to access the famed Lower Canyon. CPR is not budging on its demand to have liability covered. Golden took a proactive approach to the impasse, hiring a company to investigate access both through the CPR territory as well as from other points.
CPR is almost as old as Canada itself. Founded in …

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Canada 150

Posted on May 19th, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
We’re only six short weeks away from the beginning of the summer school break and, of course, the upcoming Canada 150 festivities. Communities in the Valley are beginning to finalize plans and, with the help of grants from a $200 million fund created by the federal government to provide additional funding for events across our great nation, it will be a weekend to remember.
Here at The Pioneer, we have something special in store for you, our dedicated readers. Beginning today in our May 19th edition and running …

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Rivalry and support

Posted on May 12th, 2017 by


By Nikki Fredrikson
Pioneer Staff
It seems with every election comes a rivalry between parties, candidates, and occasionally supporters, however, I was surprised to see that ‘rivalry’ so to speak, dissolve as the polls rolled in.
I spent election night at NDP candidate Gerry Taft’s office, covering the election from his side of things and I was surprised by the amount of support the Columbia River-Revelstoke riding candidates had for each other.
While the battle waged on between the Liberals and the NDP to win the swing riding of Columbia River-Revelstoke the …

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Speak Up

Posted on May 5th, 2017 by


By Lorene Keitch
Pioneer Staff
In a community of such passion and pride, it was hard to believe the lack of attendance at last week’s school board public hearing (see page 3 for the related story).
Was it a lack of interest? Doubtful. The proposed changes would see a big shift in Invermere, with kindergarten to Grade 7 students split between two schools close to each other. The public hearing last October saw 40 residents speak out. The ongoing discussion on social media provides evidence of interest.
Was it a lack of information? …

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Science

Posted on April 28th, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
“Listen up Apple! You too, Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, IBM, Tesla and all you other technology based multinationals. We demand that you change. In the future we, the citizens of the world, insist that you begin basing policy and innovation decisions on unproven opinion rather than good science”.
If this were the case you would see investment money sprinting for the door, looking for opportunities that were far more fundamentally sound. If the markets won’t tolerate opinion-based decision-making in the private sector then why do we settle for it …

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Religious rights

Posted on April 21st, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette,
Pioneer Staff
While in Cranbrook on Tuesday I found myself walking through a gaggle of media types as I entered the courthouse.
I was told that the media, from local to national to wire services, were in town to cover the precedent-setting trial of Winston Blackmore and James Oler. Both Blackmore and Oler are members of a polygamist community in the Kootenay region and both are alleged to have multiple wives, which is a violation of current Canadian law.
Beyond the theatrics of the current court proceedings, the court …

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Public hearings

Posted on April 14th, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
We have already had a number of controversial public hearings this year and there are certainly more to come. Criticism has been aimed at elected officials in advance of these public hearings, anger that is misplaced and misdirected. This week I will use this space to explain the how’s and why’s of public hearings.
Public hearings are commonly scheduled when a new bylaw or amendment to a bylaw is being considered, or when a rezoning application has been put before a council.
The first step in the process of …

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Foolishness revealed

Posted on April 7th, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Publisher
Another April Fools has come and gone and we at The Pioneer hope that you enjoyed this year’s silliness.
To set the record straight, we start with one of the stories in the RCMP report in which an 18-wheeler ended up on top of Mount Swansea, complete with (photoshopped) picture.
Canal Flats announced that it would be installing traffic lights and that won’t be happening anytime soon.
Our Page Six editorial dealt with the upcoming Sasquatch Centennial, a play on Canada’s 150th birthday, also known as the sesquicentennial. No …

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Sasquatch Centennial

Posted on March 31st, 2017 by


By Dean Midyette
Pioneer Staff
July 1st, 1917 marked the first official sighting of a sasquatch (also known locally as Bigfoot) by settlers in the West Kootenays, about 60 kilometres north of Creston.
The legend of the sasquatch, or local variants, began hundreds of years ago, passed along through oral history from Aboriginal peoples throughout the world, with the North American stories centered in the Pacific Northwest.
Some of the mythology describes the beasts as powerful and huge while others, like the Ebu Gogo in Indonesia, are described as short and wiry. …

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Trail talk

Posted on March 24th, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Spring has sprung and the snow and ice that’s accumulated around our communities is quickly melting away. If you’re like me, you’ve already been out exploring your favourite trails in the valley floor, revelling in the feeling of terra firma beneath your feet and enjoying the ease of walking freely without all that white stuff around.
Don’t get me wrong, I love snow and ice, but it’s been a particularly long, cold winter and I can’t wait to start up all my summer pastimes of backcountry hiking, …

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Resident retained

Posted on March 17th, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
It would appear the Columbia Valley’s Resident Attraction and Retention Strategy is working.
When I moved to the valley in April 2012 to become The Valley Echo’s editor, I thought I’d live here for a fun one to two years before moving onto my next career stint. But then I was offered the position of magazine editor with The Pioneer, and eventually I found myself as the editor of both The Pioneer and The Echo as well as all the magazines our office produces. Somehow five years …

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Happy Husbands’ Day

Posted on March 10th, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has make a point of reiterating to Canadians and the rest of the world that he is a feminist — and it appears like he is the only Trudeau who is. Canada’s First Lady Sophie Gregoire Trudeau began International Women’s Day on March 8th by posting a photograph of herself in pink holding her hubby’s hand while gazing adoringly up into his eyes with a caption telling women to share a photo of themselves holding hands with their “male ally” in honour of …

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Having a healthy fear of fentanyl

Posted on March 3rd, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
The month of January saw 116 illicit drug overdose deaths in B.C., up almost 40 per cent from the year before. This number averages out to seven deaths every two days in January, and according to the BC Coroners Office, this sharp spike is unequivocally due to fentanyl.
The awareness displayed by local business leaders in training their staff on how to use naloxone kits to rescue someone suffering from a fentanyl overdose is reassuring — and admirable. Acknowledging that the valley is a weekend or holiday getaway …

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Speculation news and the B.C. budget

Posted on February 24th, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
The Liberals released their fifth consecutive balanced budget on Tuesday and in-depth analysis of it has dominated headlines and the airwaves. And rightly so — it’s worthy of debate.
The budget contains some dramatic changes for B.C. residents, like the 50 per cent cut to MSP premiums we can expect a year from now and a big re-investment into public education — either positive changes thanks to a healthy economy or pre-election political spin depending on who you talk to, with critics reminding that the rest of …

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Saying goodbye

Posted on February 17th, 2017 by


By Eric Elliott
Pioneer Staff
When I first arrived in the Columbia Valley, the only intention on my mind was that my stay would be a pit stop in my life. I was a cocky—not to be confused with confident—22 year old kid fresh out of journalism school that thought of my move from Ontario to small town Invermere B.C. as more of a couple lines on a future resume than a life changing experience.
I couldn’t have been more wrong.
It started with my first story in May 2016, covering the …

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Development debate

Posted on February 10th, 2017 by


By Nicole Trigg
Pioneer Staff
A new development proposed for the east side of Lake Windermere has managed to stir up controversy even though a decision to not approve it seems fairly cut and dry — even appropriate — since most public and political sentiment runs counter to the developer’s vision, as does the area’s Official Community Plan, which is managed by the Regional District of East Kootenay (RDEK) since the land is situated in Area F.
The developer proposes to subdivide 23 acres into six smaller lakefront lots. Strong opposition was …

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