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Keep your pets safe this Halloween

Halloween can be the most dangerous night of the year for your cats and dogs

As ghost and goblins get set to hit the streets for All-Hallows’ Eve, the sounds of fireworks, children yelling and door bells ringing will fill the air.

Sounds that can be daunting to the ears of family pets and just as scary as the night itself is suppose to be.

Halloween can be one of the most dangerous nights of the year for cats, dogs and other animals. Stressed pets can behave out of character, biting or scratching people and even running away.

The BC SPCA is helping animal guardians to watch out for their furry ones this Oct. 31, by planning ahead and keeping pets happy and calm.

Tips include:

  • Keep pets inside: Pets who are inside have fewer opportunities to confront trick-or-treaters.
  • Identification: Make sure your pet is wearing identification. Dogs and cats may try to run away if they feel threatened.
  • Candy is for people: Candy can lead to health problems such as diabetes or obesity, and chocolate is especially dangerous because it contains theobromine, which is toxic to dogs and cats.
  • Leave home without them: If you think it would be fun to bring your pet trick-or-treating, your pet may not share your view. The strange sights and sounds of Halloween can cause a normally friendly dog to bite if it feels scared or threatened.
  • Don’t costume your pet: Dressing your dog in a costume inhibits his ability to communicate, making him prone to display aggression himself or be subjected to aggressive behaviour from other dogs.


@Jen_zee
jen.zielinski@bpdigital.ca

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