Local author D.M. Ditson offers glimpse to recovery

Book launches for Wide Open at Invermere and Radium public libraries

Calm and confident, author D.M. Ditson stands at the rickety black metal music stand. She glances around the room, the smiling faces of trusted friends looking back at her inside Mountain Hub. She takes another breath, looks down at the pages, and begins to read.

Ms. Ditson, local author and Pioneer reporter, has been leading up to this moment since she was a little girl and the disconnect between what was told to her and what she noticed seemed off. Since she was a teenager, and people in authority laughed at what they should have taken seriously. Since she was an adult, facing the most excruciating moments of her life. Since she spiraled downwards, her body literally convulsing from the trauma stored in her cells. Since she sought recovery from sexual assault and post-traumatic stress disorder. Since she took pen to paper and began to write her way through her journey, then share – ever so carefully – her words as she found healing. Since her words turned into paragraphs turned into pages turned into chapters turned into a book.

Wide Open was released on May 1st. The reading at Mountain Hub was a practice event in preparation for a whirlwind book tour launch earlier this month that took Ms. Ditson across three provinces and drew national media attention including a live interview with CTV, four CBC radio interviews that aired from Saskatchewan to British Columbia, even a mention in the Globe and Mail.

Each book launch includes Ms. Ditson reading several excerpts from her book, a short talk then a question and answer session.

The response to the book has been positive and encouraging so far, she said. Reviewers have heaped high praise on Wide Open, from calling it the “must-read memoir of the year” to a brave and powerful story. An Amazon review said it was a great book that will help many people. It is to that end Ms. Ditson is sharing her experience.

“I wanted to share my story in order to help other people see there’s a way out,” she said. “It’s been exhilarating for me to be able to share it and have it resonate with other people and have it help and support them.”

While Wide Open covers very heavy topics, expect the book launch to show the triumphant and positive arc of the story, on how to make a good life again after something hard happens.

“The book is about sexual assault, post traumatic stress disorder, and recovery. It’s pretty raw, it’s pretty graphic, and it shows exactly how I clawed my way out of the throes of that illness,” she said. But, “even though there are a lot of painful parts to my story, I think overall it’s a really positive message.”

The latest stop on her book tour brings Ms. Ditson back to the Columbia Valley, where she will be reading from her memoir at two separate events at the Invermere and Radium public libraries. The Invermere Public Library hosts Ms. Ditson Saturday, June 1st at 2 p.m. Radium Public Library hosts an event Tuesday, June 4th from 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Just Posted

Alone together during COVID-19

How local families are coping during COVID-19

All fitness centres, gyms and yoga studios ordered to close immediately

Many Columbia Valley fitness centres were already closed

Columbia Basin Trust offering $11.7 million to help with COVID-19

Columbia Basin Trust is announcing $11.7 million in new funding to provide immediate support.

Tire shop encourages social distancing

Local OK Tire calls for extra caution

Hospital’s Chief of Staff asks for vigilance

Doctor stresses vigilance and compliance to guidelines to mitigate future surge in COVID-19 cases

Trudeau rejects mandatory stay-at-home order for now; COVID deaths up

The virus has now infected more than 10,000 Canadians and cost 130 their lives

B.C. health officer says homemade masks may prevent spread of COVID-19 to others

Practising physical distancing, frequent hand washing and resisting touching your face are proven methods

B.C.’s senior home staff measures show results in COVID-19 battle

Dr. Bonnie Henry’s order restricts care aides to one facility

‘A matter of human decency’: Truckers’ union calls on gas stations, rest stops to fully re-open

Teamsters Canada wants feds, provinces to put pressure on facilities to re-open for transport workers

B.C. unveils $3.5M COVID-19 emergency fund for post-secondary students

Money will help students cover living expenses, food, travel, portable computers

‘We will get through this’: B.C. sees new COVID-19 death, but 57% have recovered

A total of 1,066 people have tested positive for the novel coronavirus

Canada’s 75% wage subsidy is coming, but not for several weeks: finance minister

Subsidy will cost Canada $71 billion, but push down cost of emergency benefit, Morneau said

COVID-19: ‘The Ballad of Bonnie Henry’ recorded and released

LISTEN: Quick turnaround for song penned by B.C. Order of Canada musician Phil Dwyer

Most Read