New tree guards to be established as part of beautification project in Radium

Design options for tree guards in Radium up for consideration at council meeting

As part of the current Resort Municipality strategy for streetscape beautification, a plan to install tree guards to protect the boulevard trees from Bighorn Sheep abuse was on the table at the Wednesday, November 8th Village of Radium Hot Springs council meeting. Feedback on the issue was requested to move forward with the project.

“These will stand up well and they will certainly be more aesthetic than the current wired ones,” said Mark Read, chief administrative officer for the village.

Council was faced with the option of considering a standard tree guard that can be purchased from a number of manufacturers or to create a custom tree guard with the help of a local metal working manufacturer.

Practicality and functionality were high on the desired qualities for the new tree guards with the allotted budget for the project sitting at $40,000. A total of 77 trees would need to be protected within the highway boulevards and the price per unit for the standard guards was set at $670 as opposed to the $1,070 for the custom designed units.

Approximately $16,000 would be required in a future budget for the purchase of the standard units, and a consideration of $44,000 would be required to purchase the custom units, according to figures provided in a report to council.

“I like the idea that less is more because the trees are pretty showy and the sheep are around,” said Mayor Clara Reinhardt who favoured the standard tree guards, though council member Tyler McCauley interjected that custom tree guards might be a favourable option for the Village.

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