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Appeal dismissed for B.C. man who assaulted woman in ‘thoroughly modern’ fight over phone

‘Both were seeking evidence of cheating by the other,’ says B.C. Supreme Court in Nanaimo

A B.C. man who assaulted his girlfriend while she tried to take back her phone from him had his appeal dismissed.

B.C. Supreme Court in Nanaimo heard last month the case of a man who appealed a conviction of assault causing bodily harm stemming from an altercation with his girlfriend on the couch at their home.

“They each had possession of the other’s phone while they were arguing. In thoroughly modern fashion, they were both seeking evidence of cheating by the other,” noted the court decision, released Thursday, Nov. 21.

The 120-pound woman suffered a broken leg, bruises to her arms, and a fingernail ripped off in an altercation with the 220-240-pound man and the appeal related to the circumstances of how the injuries happened.

“The accused got angry with her over the cellphone notifications, and pushed down on her while she was using her leg to get him off her,” the trial judge found. “The injury resulted from his weight on her leg, and he applied his force deliberately in order to get the phone from her.”

The appellant alleged errors by the trial judge, suggesting that there wasn’t medical evidence to corroborate the explanation of how the harm occurred, so the judge opined on how the injury occurred and the force applied.

The appellant sought to provide new evidence – an expert report from an orthopedic surgeon who concluded that “the complainant kicking out in a forceful extension motion of the knee” was the reason for the injury.

The Supreme Court judge found that the “assumptions as to the mechanisms of injury given to [the doctor] were not reflective of the evidence at trial” and concluded that admitting the expert report was “not necessary to avoid a miscarriage of justice.”

The News Bulletin is not reporting the appellant’s name to try to protect the identity of the victim.

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editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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