Environment Minister George Heyman (Hansard TV)

B.C. backing Ottawa in Canadian carbon pricing court battle

Saskatchewan, Ontario argue fuel taxes are up to provinces

The B.C. government is intervening in two court cases to back the Justin Trudeau government’s plan to impose carbon tax on provinces that are refusing to impose carbon pricing themselves.

Ontario and Saskatchewan have cases in their appeal courts arguing the federal government doesn’t have jurisdiction to impose fuel taxes on provinces. B.C. already has a carbon tax higher than that required by Ottawa for 2020 and is is concerned about being put at a competitive disadvantage with provinces that don’t, said B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman.

“Greenhouse gases do not respect provincial boundaries or international boundaries for that matter,” Heyman said Tuesday. “We will argue that there will be harm to our competitiveness if other provinces do not put a price on carbon.”

Attorney General David Eby said B.C. will argue that both the provinces and the federal government have a role to play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“Our position is supported by repeated decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada,” Eby said.

Premier Doug Ford cancelled Ontario’s cap-and-trade system for carbon pricing earlier this year, and fuel prices have dipped below a dollar a litre in recent days. Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe says his province is using carbon capture and storage, and the federal plan makes Saskatchewan’s oil and gas industry uncompetitive.

Ottawa’s legislation requires all provinces to have a price of $10 per tonne of greenhouse gas emissions in place this year, rising by $10 each year until it reaches $50 in 2022. Trudeau has said Ottawa will impose a tax on provinces that don’t implement one, and return the money to each province.

B.C.’s carbon tax is charged on the amount of emission, whatever the price of fuels. This year’s increase, imposed a year earlier than the NDP proposed as a condition of the B.C. Green Party supporting their minority government, brings the carbon tax to $35 a tonne of carbon dioxide or equivalent emissions.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislature

Just Posted

Invermere gets new CAO

Invermere found his new CAO after a long period of research.

Radium council discusses short term rentals

RHS council are elaborating the second draft plan for STR

Beautification process begins in Canal Flats downtown

Canal Flats wants to improve the esthetic of the town

More consultation on LWRL to come this fall

Invermere council meeting discussed about the Athlamer neighbourhood plan

Local advocates for CBT climate change priority

Tracy Flynn ask the local government for action on climate change

Quirky Canadian comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek’ takes Emmys by storm with comedy sweep

Toronto-raised Daniel Levy and Ottawa-born Annie Murphy both got supporting actor nods

181 days gone: Family continues to look for man last seen in RCMP custody 6 months ago

Brandon Sakebow’s last known location was leaving Mission RCMP cell, police say; family has doubts

B.C. unveils new cannabis sales programs to help small, Indigenous growers

Government did not say how it will define small producers, but says nurseries will be included in the policy

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Most Read