The Washington Department of Ecology has announced an agreement with a Langley family trust to repair shoreline and a wetland. (Washington State photo)

B.C. family trust ordered to restore shoreline on Lake Osoyoos property

Owned by a Langley family, the Washington State property will see all ecological damages repaired

The Washington State Department of Ecology says a Langley family trust will make required environmental repairs to its waterfront property in that state.

Under a settlement agreement with the state government, the Teade DeVries Family Trust has agreed to restore a shoreline and wetland on Lake Osoyoos in Okanogan County, Washington.

In winter 2013, the trust installed a 500-foot long bulkhead and filled in a wetland on its 1.3 acre property, the Department of Ecology said in a news release about the agreement.

The trust must now remove the bulkhead and fill material, and restore the shoreline and wetlands of this fish-critical lake.

Bulkheads can reduce the amount of available food to juvenile steelhead because the structures can replace or crowd out vegetation providing important habitat for insects and other food sources. The structures can also increase the likelihood juvenile salmon and steelhead will be eaten by predatory fish because they normally hide in water too shallow for larger fish to enter.

“Bulkheads also encourage erosion in the lakebed because the energy that causes shore erosion gets redirected,” said Dale Bambrick, NOAA-Fisheries Columbia Basin Branch chief in Ellensburg. “As the lakebed erodes, water levels in the nearshore deepen, allowing larger predatory fish to pursue juvenile fish up to the water’s edge.”

The trust entered into the agreement after having appealed an administrative order from the state government in August 2015 to the state Pollution Control Hearings Board.

In lieu of a hearing and further litigation, the trust agreed to enter into a settlement agreement.

It has 90 days to acquire the necessary permits and approvals, then nine months to develop a restoration plan for the work which is on the American side of the lake which straddles the Canada-US border.

Just Posted

First presumptive case of coronavirus identified in the Interior Health region

The woman, in her 30s, travelled from Shanghai and lives in the interior

Robbery with a hammer at Invermere Dairy Queen

Robber makes off with undisclosed amount of cash.

Talking valley politics

Local politicians offered an update on their communities and progess.

Who should own James Chabot park?

Invermere asks for James Chabot park back from province

January precipitation deepens snowpack in B.C.’s mountains

Most of the province now has higher-than-normal snowpack levels

VIDEO: 7 things you need to know about the 2020 B.C. budget

Surplus of $227 million with big spending on infrastructure and capital projects

Trees Cannabis director fined $1.5M for selling marijuana

Fine follows provincial crackdown on popular dispensary

World Cup skier from Okanagan dies suddenly at 19

Kuroda, who made his World Cup debut earlier this year, passed away suddenly Monday night.

Coastal GasLink pipeline investor committed to closing deal despite protests

Developer TC Energy Corp. — formerly TransCanada Corp. — is to remain the operator of the $6.6-billion pipeline

Police narrow down timeline in death of woman in West Kootenay

West Kootenay Traffic Services and BC Coroners Service working on the case

New highway proposed between Alberta and B.C.

The route would connect Red Deer to Kamloops

What’s in a name? The story of Revelstoke’s Mt. Begbie

It’s likely the iconic peak had several Indigenous peoples’ names before settlers arrived

Budget 2020: B.C. Liberals blast ‘Netflix tax,’ lack of economic plan

ICBC rates still go up, except in election year, Shirley Bond says

Teen snowmobiler from Kelowna found after air force’s overnight search

The teen had been missing since just after 6 p.m. on Monday

Most Read