B.C. Indigenous protesters build tiny homes in Trans Mountain pipeline’s path

Protesters have built similar homes to those at the Standing Rock protest in the United States

Members of the Secwepemc Nation in British Columbia say they are building the first of 10 tiny homes that will be placed directly in the path of Kinder Morgan’s $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Kanahus Manuel of the Secwepemc Women’s Warrior Society says the house is a symbol of sustainability in the face of an environmentally damaging project and is based on homes built at the Standing Rock protest in the United States.

READ MORE: B.C. government to outline next steps on Trans Mountain pipeline

Manuel says she lived in a tiny home at the Dakota Access Pipeline protest for three months in 2016 and asked the designer of the building to create plans for buildings that could be placed in Trans Mountain’s path.

She says the mobile houses will be occupied by people struggling with a housing crisis in the Secwepemc Nation and will be 5.5 metres wide and 3.6 metres tall with a wood stove and solar panels.

Trans Mountain, a subsidiary of Kinder Morgan Canada, did not immediately respond to a request for comment but it announced yesterday that it had hired six contractors in advance of planned pipeline construction activities this month.

Fifty-one First Nations have signed mutual benefit agreements with Trans Mountain, including some bands that are part of the broader Secwepemc Nation, but the project still faces strong opposition from some Indigenous groups.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Olympics through an Olympian’s eyes

And family support back home that makes the journey possible

Brewing the best at upcoming Coffee Fest

Full weekend of events for coffee and tea lovers

Cold snap increases electricity use across B.C.

Don’t want your next powerbill to hit you hard? Follow these tips from BC Hydro

VIDEO: Top 10 B.C. budget highlights

The NDP is focusing on childcare, affordable housing and speeding up the elimination of MSP premiums

Wartime Wednesdays

Local author Elinor Florence explores the stories of veterans

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Two Haida men detained for crossing U.S.-Canada border

Edenshaw and Frisby travelled from Alaska to Prince Rupert for the All Native Basketball Tournament

Alberta takes out full-page ads in B.C. over strained relationship

It’s the latest move between the two provinces over progress on Trans Mountain pipeline expansion

B.C. teacher suspended over allegedly using N-word in worksheets

Trafalgar Elementary teacher under investigation by Vancouver School Board

Toddler swept away in Ontario floods

Toddler missing as flooding forces thousands from their homes in Ontario

BC BUDGET: New money helps seniors’ care shortage

Job stability for care aides key to recruitment, union leader says

Mixed messages on B.C.’s efforts to cool hot housing market

Economist says undersupply of homes in Metro Vancouver, Victoria and Kelowna will keep prices high

Most Read