The B.C. government has removed personal limits for residents who bring in out-of-province liquor home from other jurisdictions across the country. Pixabay photo.

B.C. removes personal limits for bringing home out-of-province alcohol

Previous relgulations placed limits on the amount of liquor that B.C. residents could bring home

The B.C. government has removed personal limits and restrictions for bringing alcohol home from across provincial and territorial borders.

Under previous regulations, there were limits on the amount of liquor that B.C. residents could bring home for personal consumption, while similar restrictions were placed by other provinces and territories on B.C. products entering their jurisdictions.

READ: Ottawa moves to lift alcohol trade restrictions, urges provinces to do the same

“For too long, British Columbians faced restrictions when bringing wine, beer and spirits from other provinces back to B.C. Our government has taken action to fix this,” said Bruce Ralston, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology. “This policy is consistent with the direction from the Council of Federation meeting in Saskatoon last week, where Canada’s premiers committed to reduce limits on transporting alcohol across our borders.”

Other provinces, such as Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia, have removed personal limits, while Prince Edward Island is in the process of removing the regulation.

British Columbia’s previous rules only allowed three litres of spirits, nine litres of wine, and 25.6 litres of beer, cider and coolers, however, no such limits were placed on Canadian-made wine.



trevor.crawley@cranbrooktownsman.com

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