Bald eagle hit by a train in Vanderhoof, taken to the Lower Mainland by BC Conservation Officers. (BCCOS photo)

Bald eagle hit by train in northern B.C. has a chance of survival

The raptor has been taken to OWL in the Lower Mainland for recovery

A bald eagle hit by a train in Vanderhoof was given a ride to the Lower Mainland, and she now has a shot at survival, says the non-profit taking care of the raptor.

BC Conservation Officer Service drove the eagle down to OWL in Delta. OWL is a non-profit dedicated to the survival of all raptors.

The bald eagle is alive, “which is a big thing,” says Rob Hope, raptor care manager with OWL.

The non-profit received the bald eagle at their facility Feb. 28.

“The conservation officers were nice enough to drive her down. She has some paralysis, as well as head trauma,” Hope added.

In such cases, time is the biggest factor as sometimes birds recover on their own with little medical attention. He said the eagle could have spinal or nerve injury.

As the raptor was healthy before the accident, she in good-shape considering what she went through.

“For her to survive the initial injury and for the volunteers to pick her up and drive her down in time, all helped,” he said.

READ MORE: Bear conflicts keep B.C. Conservation Officers busy


Aman Parhar
Editor, Vanderhoof Omineca Express

aman.parhar@ominecaexpress.com

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