BC Conservation Officer Service is investigating the killing of a black bear that was left whole and then burned on a fire pit in a Shuswap gravel pit weeks later. (File photo)

Bear shot, later burned in Shuswap gravel pit, sparking B.C. Conservation officers probe

A black bear killed and dumped in a Tappen gravel pit in mid-April, says BC COS.

WARNING: This story contains an image which some people may find disturbing

A black bear killed and dumped in a Tappen gravel pit just off a main road has been concerning passersby and keeping the BC Conservation Officers Service searching for leads since mid April.

Conservation Officer Mike Richardson first got the call about the bear which had been dumped in a pit off Skimikin Lake Road on April 16 or 17. Richardson said the bear had been shot.

READ MORE: District grant helps residents and staff in Sicamous seniors facilities stay safe and connected

READ MORE: Salmon Arm’s RJ Haney heritage park closed but not sitting idle

A lawful spring hunting season on black bears runs from April 1 to June 30 in the area where the dead bear was found. Richardson said the dead bear was left whole, which is in violation of the law that requires hunters to remove all edible portions of the animal.

Richardson said the other possible explanation for a bear with a bullet in it is that it was shot by someone protecting themselves or their property. He said the COs are still looking for the person responsible if this was the case, because incidents where animals are destroyed for protection must be reported to them.

READ MORE: Newborn feral foal euthanized after fall

READ MORE: Stober family makes donation to support training of Okanagan’s frontline workers

The story got stranger and the calls to conservation officers continued as April drew to a close. Richardson said they began receiving calls about the bear again when someone dragged it onto a fire pit and burned the weeks-old carcass. One caller was concerned that the animal had been tortured but Richardson said the person or people who killed the bear and those who burned it are almost certainly separate groups.

Richardson said the Conservation Officer Service appreciates when the public reports suspicious dumped animal carcasses. He urged anyone who is disposing of legally killed animals to do so well away from places frequented by the public. Even discarded bones and hides generate concern from the public and calls to the COs. He said discarded wildlife can also draw dangerous animals to populated areas.



jim.elliot@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

bearsConservation

 

BC Conservation Officer Service is investigating the killing of a black bear that was left whole and then burned on a fire pit in a Shuswap gravel pit weeks later. (Shandy Sim/Facebook)

Just Posted

Survivor compensated for Sixties Scoop

Meraw recently received compensation from the Sixties Scoop Settlement

Interim payments issued to survivors

Interim payments issued for claims made through Collectiva’s Class Action Sixties Scoop Settlement

Advocacy for Secwepemc language

Archie believes Secwepemc language learning can steer First Nation children toward a positive life

Pruden plans to step down

Pruden will not run as an incumbent for the Métis women’s chair during this year’s MNBC election

Sport camps to help youth become better overall athletes

Athletic camps for youth coming to valley this month

Lawsuit launched after Florida child handcuffed, booked and briefly jailed

Suit alleges “deliberate indifference” to what should have been handled as a behavioural issue

Russia approves vaccine, Putin hopes to begin mass production

Critic calls decision to proceed without thorough testing ‘dangerous and grossly immoral’

Man, 54, charged in connection with fatal attack of Red Deer doctor

Doctor was killed in his walk-in clinic on Monday

Doctor slain in Alberta medical clinic was devoted father, husband

Red Deer doctors on edge after attack on colleague who had two young daughters

Royal B.C. Museum wants B.C.’s COVID-19 nature observations

COVID-19 Collecting For Our Time: ongoing project cataloguing province’s pandemic experience

Feds offer ‘life preserver’ funds to BC Ferries as pandemic sinks revenue

For every dollar the province spends the federal government will match

Bad behaviour at B.C. restaurants ignites campaign calling for respect

“If you can’t follow the rules, then stay home,” says BC Restaurant and Foodservices Association

Over half of Americans oppose Trump tariff on Canadian aluminum: survey

The survey was conducted Aug. 7 to 9 among 1,513 Canadians and 1,003 Americans

Most Read