Canadian couple jailed for supplying woman’s son, 13, with weed

The couple, now broken up, were both in their 30s and unemployed in Nova Scotia

A couple who regularly gave marijuana to the woman’s 13-year-old son — and ridiculed him when he coughed while smoking it — have been jailed by a Nova Scotia judge.

“In the … household there was a culture of marijuana use,” Judge Paul Scovil said in a sentencing decision released Tuesday.

“It was not legal to give a 13-year old recreational cannabis at the time of the offence, it is not legal now and it is highly unlikely it ever will be.”

The couple, now broken up, were both in their 30s and unemployed. Both had only a Grade 9 education and multiple prior convictions.

The Bridgewater, N.S., provincial court judge said the mother had two marijuana plants growing in a room marked with a sign: “Mum’s Grow Op.”

“(The boy) was invited to, and given marijuana, to smoke regularly on weekends … (He) indicated he would smoke marijuana six to seven times every weekend he spent at his mothers. At times, if he coughed when smoking he was called a ‘pussy.’”

The boy’s father, who shared custody with his estranged wife, discovered what was going on when he caught his son trying to smoke catnip in his basement and the boy confessed.

READ MORE: 10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

The mother was found guilty of producing marijuana, while the stepfather was convicted of trafficking, between Oct. 1, 2016, and Jan. 7, 2017.

The mother was ordered to serve 45 days in jail, while the stepfather was jailed 90 days. Both can serve the time intermittently, likely on weekends.

“While the production of the number of plants that (the mother) had in 2016 may be legal now, that production was illegal then,” said the judge.

The teen’s older brother had previously pleaded guilty to trafficking by giving his sibling cannabis, and was given a 12-month conditional sentence.

The boy’s stepfather argued that he made no money, that the crime amounted to “a moral breach and only a technical violation of the law,” and that his sentence should be mitigated because the drugs were shared within a family unit, the judge said.

But the judge noted that the legislation makes clear that Parliament “has specific concerns regarding the provision of drugs of any kind to children.”

“I wish to make it very clear, the legalization of cannabis does not lessen the concern of society in making this product available to minors,” the judge said.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Jumbo saga reaches finale

A three-decade long disagreement comes to a close.

Former Waterside property to be rezoned?

Invermere residents supported rezoning Waterside property.

Angel Flight

Flights take patients for medical appointments.

Potential pints and a paroled peacock

Radium council discussed a micro-brewery and one of the village’s wildlife mascots.

UBC, Iranian-Canadian community create memorial scholarship in honour of victims

The Jan. 8 crash killed 176 people, including 57 Canadians

Disrespectful that Horgan won’t meet during northern B.C. tour: hereditary chief

Na’moks said he was frustrated Horgan didn’t meet with the chiefs

Canucks extend home win streak to 8 with 4-1 triumph over Sharks

Victory lifts Vancouver into top spot in NHL’s Pacific Division

BC Green Party leader visits northern B.C. pipeline protest site

Adam Olsen calls for better relationship between Canada, British Columbia and First Nations

‘Extensive’ work planned at Big Bar landslide ahead of salmon, steelhead migration

Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan visited the site of the slide from June

B.C. society calls out conservation officer after dropping off bear cub covered in ice

Ice can be seen in video matted into emaciated bear cub’s fur

Royal deal clears way for Harry, Meghan part-time Canada move: experts

Keith Roy of the Monarchist League of Canada said the deal is exactly what Harry and Meghan asked for

Most Read