Prime Minister Justin Trudeau meets with the Aga Khan on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on May 17, 2016. The federal Conservatives want the RCMP watchdog to review the police force’s refusal to launch a criminal investigation into whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau broke the law by accepting family vacations on the Aga Khan’s private Caribbean island. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Conservatives lodge complaint over RCMP’s refusal to probe Trudeau’s island stays

Trudeau and his family vacationed on Aga Khan’s private Caribbean island

The federal Conservatives want the RCMP watchdog to review the police force’s refusal to launch a criminal investigation into whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau broke the law by accepting family vacations on the Aga Khan’s private Caribbean island.

In a letter to the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP this week, Tory MP Michael Barrett says there are troubling elements the commission is well-placed to investigate.

Last May, Conservative MP Peter Kent asked RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki to begin a probe, saying a thorough investigation should be conducted to reassure Canadians about the integrity of government.

Kent’s 26-page letter noted that members of Trudeau’s family visited the private retreat of the Aga Khan, a billionaire philanthropist and the spiritual leader of the world’s Ismaili Muslims, on three occasions from 2014 to 2017.

Lucki replied in August that the RCMP could not productively pursue a criminal investigation.

In December 2017, Mary Dawson, federal ethics commissioner at the time, found Trudeau contravened four sections of the Conflict of Interest Act in relation to a Christmas 2016 stay on the island, saying the holiday could reasonably be seen as a gift designed to influence the prime minister.

In his letter, Kent cited a Criminal Code provision that prohibits a government official from accepting a benefit of any kind from someone who has dealings with the government.

Dawson’s report said the federal government had supported projects of the Aga Khan Foundation Canada by contributing nearly $330 million to initiatives in various countries.

The government also regularly consulted foundation representatives on current and emerging development trends and priorities, she noted.

Following Dawson’s 2017 findings, opposition parties argued Trudeau should refund the treasury for all or part of the transportation and security costs related to the Christmas 2016 trip.

Trudeau acknowledged at the time he should have checked with the ethics commissioner’s office before accepting the holiday, and said he would now clear all family vacations with the commissioner.

READ MORE: Conservatives seek criminal investigation of Trudeau’s trips to Aga Khan’s island

Jim Bronskill , The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Hospital chief of staff provides a COVID-19 update; face coverings available for free starting this weekend

Vigilance needed; face coverings soon to be available throughout valley

Easter weekend no time to let up on COVID-19 safety

Provincial health officer warns against travelling this weekend

Invermere mayor says bill payments can wait and asks visitors to please stay home

Al Miller provides an update on the District of Invermere and COVID-19.

Digital marketing graduation

Digital marketing skills vital to businesses since COVID-19 pandemic began

Social distancing for wildlife, please

Outdoor photographers urge humans not to get too close to local wildlife.

UPDATE: Canadians awake to extra COVID-19 emergency benefit money, feds clarify changes

The CRA and federal officials are working to clarify the confusion around payments

B.C. sorting medical equipment sales, donation offers for COVID-19

Supply hub has call out for masks, gowns, coronavirus swabs

B.C. records five more deaths due to COVID-19, 45 new cases

A total of 838 people have recovered from the virus

Major crimes investigating sudden death of North Okanagan child

The 8 year old was flown to Kelowna General Hospital and died hours later

Easter Bunny added to B.C.’s list of essential workers

Premier John Horgan authorizes bunny to spread “eggs-ellent cheer” throughout province

Travellers returning to B.C. must have self-isolation plan or face quarantine: Horgan

Premier John Horgan says forms must be filled out by travellers

More than 400 animals have been adopted amid pandemic: B.C. SPCA

People are taking this time of social distancing to find a loyal companion through the animal welfare group

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Most Read