Deadline looms for municipal candidates seeking office

hose thinking about a run for mayor or council have only until this Friday, October 10th to file for candidacy

 

Municipal elections take place around the province on Saturday, November 15th, and those thinking about a run for mayor or council have only until this Friday, October 10th to file for candidacy.

Some tweaks have been made to democracy since the last election, with the most impactful being the extension of terms from three years to four.

But as always, Invermere, Canal Flats, and Radium Hot Springs will all elect one mayor and four councillors.

In order to run for council, candidates must be at least 18-years-old, a Canadian resident, a B.C. resident for at least six months prior to the election, and not disqualified for previous election tampering.

Those looking to throw their name in the ring can receive a thick information package from their respective municipal quarters. There are six forms which must be filled out, seven circumstantial forms which don’t apply to every candidate, and one optional form. They must be filled out and submitted by 4 p.m. on Friday.

Candidates lacking faith in the voting or counting process can appoint scrutineers to keep a watch over each polling station.

Campaign spending is highly monitored, and each candidate will need a financial agent (candidates can be their own financial agent though). Disclosure statements will now require more comprehensive information.

Due to changes implemented since the last election, anonymous campaign donations must now be capped at $49.99. Financial agents must otherwise send the money and a detailed record of how it came into their possession to Elections BC, before the money is transferred to the province.

Stiffer penalties have been imposed to discipline those caught out of compliance. Candidates can be jailed for up to a year and fined $5,000 for campaigning near a voting facility on election day. A two-year prison penalty and $10,000 ticket can be imposed upon those caught buying votes or intimidating voters.

Residents in every municipality can expect an opportunity to vote in an advanced poll which will be announced after candidate nominations close on this coming Friday, October 10th.

To find out more about Invermere’s 2014 municipal election, contact chief election officer Kindry Luyendyk at 250-342-9281.

 

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