Federal court dismisses Taseko’s judicial reviews

Two judicial reviews filed against the Minister of Environment, the Attorney General of Canada and the TNG have been dismissed

Taseko Mines Ltd.’s two judicial reviews regarding the rejection of its New Prosperity Gold-Copper Mine project, 120 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake, have been dismissed by the Federal Court.

In his written decision dated Dec. 5, Federal Court Judge Michael L. Phelan dismissed the judicial reviews, noting “the Court concludes that the panel did not breach any procedural fairness and the panel’s factual findings were open for it to make and were reasonable.”

Read More: Federal Court Decision

Taseko filed its first judicial review on November 29, 2013, challenging certain findings of the Canadian Environmental Assessment panel and alleging the panel failed to comply with principles of procedural fairness.

After the project was rejected by the federal government in Feb. 2014, the company filed the second judicial review, asking the Federal Court to set aside decisions by the CEAA, the Minister of Environment and the Governor in Council because of “a failure to observe the principles of natural justice and procedural fairness.”

TNG Tribal Chair Chief Joe Alphonse said the Tsilhqot’in people are relieved and happy with the Federal Court decision.

“Politicians may not recognize our title case, but judges do,” Alphonse said referring to the Tsilhqot’in rights and title win of June 2014 that declared Aboriginal title to 1,700 square kilometres in the Cariboo Chilcotin region. “Again the courts have stepped up and done the honourable thing.”

Alphonse said the ruling sends a “strong” message to industry about the importance of working with First Nations.

“We want to have opportunities, but it’s got to be done with our input and our views right from the beginning,” he said.

Taseko’s vice-president of corporate affairs Brian Battison e-mailed the Tribune Wednesday, noting at this point the company declined comment on the ruling, as it is “reviewing and considering the decision.”

Before New Prosperity, the original Prosperity Mine project was also rejected by the CEAA in 2010.

Earlier this summer the provincial government approved Taseko’s exploration drilling permits for the New Prosperity Mine project, however after both the TNG and the federal government filed injunctions, Taseko suspended the work.

Read More: TNG happy Taseko’s drilling permit put on hold

Just Posted

Fuel and copper wire thefts in Columbia Valley

Columbia Valley RCMP report October 7-13th

Stabbing in Radium leads to high-risk takedown

Two men arrested in relation to attack

Former Liberal candidate endorses Greens in Kootenay-Columbia

Don Johnston says he’ll be voting for Abra Brynne on Oct. 21

Invermere buys Athalmer land for $5 million

Celebratory barbecue to come

Explosive Dynamiters too much TNT for Rockies

Hometown crowd pulls for Rockies in last weekend’s home game

VIDEO: #MeToo leader launches new hashtag to mobilize U.S. voters

Tarana Burke hopes to prompt moderators to ask about sexual violence at next debate

UPDATE: British couple vacationing in Vancouver detained in U.S. after crossing border

CBP claims individuals were denied travel authorization, crossing was deliberate

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

Alberta to join B.C.’s class-action lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

B.C. government claims opioids were falsely marketed as less addictive than other pain meds

Most Read