First arrests made at BC Legislature after Wet’suwet’en supporters spray chalk on property

Legislature security arrested two people, allegedly for mischief

Youth supporting the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs reported that Thursday around 10 a.m. the first demonstrators were arrested.

It was the fourth day of demonstrators occupying the BC legislature in solidarity with Wet’suwet’en hereditary who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

Two people were apparently using water-soluble chalk on and around the building and arrested by Legislature Security for mischief. VicPD told Black Press Media that Legislature Security members are police and can make legal arrests.

ALSO READ: Wet’suwet’en supporters occupying legislature in Victoria hold mass day-long teach-in

According to one of the demonstrators on site, it was made clear to security that the paint was soluble chalk, despite it looking like spray paint.

The two arrested people were taken into the legislature; legal observers were denied entrance to observe.

A tweet put up by the Indigenous Youth for Wet’suwet’en said that “arrested supporters have been released and banned from the property.”

“Today we decided to use chalk in spray cans to create a very powerful visual,” said demonstrator Ace Harry. “As expected, totally in line with history, they painted us as criminals, as violent and dissident. They arrested two of our supporters who were detained and pretty immediately released because it’s chalk and doesn’t violate any laws or injunctions.”

Ta’Kaiya Blaney called the arrests laughable, and a microcosm of what’s going on in Canada.

“I wish they came to our territories with chalk paint, I wish they treaded so lightly upon our land,” she said.

– With files from Kendra Crighton

vnc.editorial@vicnews.com

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