Living Lakes Conference addresses future of water

Conference in Invermere November 29-30th

Living Lakes Canada, Columbia Basin Trust, the Columbia Basin Watershed Network and Selkirk College are inviting people in the Columbia Valley interested in the region’s water resources to join a dialogue that has the potential to help communities’ future efforts in addressing water challenges in the face of climate change impacts.

The dialogue will take place over two days during a conference at Copper Point Resort that will feature roughly 30 experts from across North America presenting on a range of water monitoring and water data-related topics, from collaborative water monitoring for source water protection, to water data hubs and government databases, to the health of Canada’s fresh waters, to best practices and collaborative data sharing with government and industry to how data is applied to policy. The water data gaps identified in the Columbia Basin Trust’s February 2017 report Water Monitoring and Climate Change in the Upper Columbia Basin will also be showcased.

“This is about climate change and understanding that the hydrology in the Columbia Basin is changing and will have impact on us and all of our lives,” said Living Lakes Canada executive director Kat Hartwig. “Climate modelling has predicted melting glaciers will change the water flows, and we have already experienced this last summer, for example. Much of the important data needed for future water allocation decisions is missing right now and should be discussed so we can have an understanding of what is required, not only for municipal water use and flow required for fish and wetland ecosystems, but also the potential impacts to recreation and tourism and farming and fishing.”

The dialogue will have particular relevance to the region’s higher-volume users such as communities and municipalities, hydropower operators, agricultural producers, industrial operations, ski resorts (snowmaking), golf courses, as well as commercial and residential users and will provide an opportunity to begin collective problem-solving.

Bursaries and day rates are available as well as dinner tickets that will include a Keynote Speaker on water stewardship. For more information and to register, visit www.livinglakescanada.ca/news/cracking-the-code/.

The Living Lakes conference takes place November 29-30th.

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