A man assists a customer from behind a plastic divider at a store in Chinatown, in Vancouver, B.C., Wednesday, June 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Online poll finds 43 per cent of Chinese-Canadians faced threats over COVID-19

Just over half expressed worry that Asian children would be bullied when they return to school

A new survey of Chinese-Canadians says 43 per cent reported being threatened or intimidated as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The online survey carried out by the Angus Reid Institute in partnership with the University of Alberta also found half report being called names or insulted due to the health crisis.

Close to a third — 30 per cent — said they were frequently exposed to racist graffiti or social media messages since the pandemic began.

Almost as many — 29 per cent — said they were frequently made to feel as though they pose a threat to the health and safety of others.

More than 60 per cent of respondents said they had changed their routines to avoid unpleasant encounters during the crisis, and just over half expressed worry that Asian children would be bullied when they return to school.

The survey was conducted online from June 15 to 18 among more than 500 Canadian adults who self-identify as ethnically Chinese. Of those, 44 per cent were born in Canada.

In accordance with polling industry standards, online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error.

READ MORE: Vancouver Police report ‘staggering’ increase in Anti-Asian hate crimes

READ MORE: Why do people get xenophobic when diseases like coronavirus hit?

The Canadian Press


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