Publication ban on name of girl killed in Abbotsford school lifted

Reimer’s family had supported an application by Black Press to lift ban

The name of Letisha Reimer, the 13-year-old girl killed in a 2016 stabbing at Abbotsford senior secondary, can once again be legally published.

The BC Review Board had banned publication of Letisha Reimer’s name after her assailant was deemed unfit to stand trial. Black Press had applied last month to lift the ban on Reimer’s name, and on Monday, Dave Teixeira, a representative for Reimer’s family, tweeted that the ban had been lifted.

Teixeira had previously said the ban, which was put in place by the review board without notifying media or other affected parties, had the effect of “muzzling” Letisha’s parents.

A ban remains in place on information that could identify a girl injured, but not killed, in the attack. Black Press did not apply to lift the ban on her name.

In the application, which was sent by reporter Tyler Olsen and crafted with the assistance of legal counsel, Black Press argued the ban on Letisha Reimer’s name contravenes the “open court principle” that presupposes courtrooms should be open to the public and information reportable.

Under the principle, courts should be open to the public unless doing so would jeopardize the administration of justice or compromise the rights of the interested parties and public.

Black Press had also pointed out that such a ban shifts the focus of coverage of such crimes away from victims and towards the accused. Teixeira had also noted that Reimer’s parents felt like they could not tell their daughter’s story because of the ban.

Read Black Press’s application below.

RELATED: Abbotsford News challenges publication ban on name of school stabbing victim

RELATED: Advocate for Abbotsford victim’s family blasts ‘secretive’ B.C. Review Board

RELATED: Man charged in Abbotsford school stabbing found unfit to stand trial


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