A former VIU staff member lodged a human rights complaint against the university, alleging female staff members and students were placed at risk of sexual harassment by a male student. (NEWS BULLETIN file)

Student’s alleged sexual role-plays lead to human rights complaint against VIU

Nanaimo university says it took appropriate actions to respond to sexual harassment concerns

A former VIU staff member lodged a human rights complaint against the university, alleging female staff members and students were placed at risk of sexual harassment by a male student.

According to an article Monday in the Globe and Mail, female staff and students were sexually harassed by a male student whose “fetishistic behaviour in and out of the classroom” included role-playing that he was an infant, wearing a soother and talking like a baby.

The article identifies the complainant as Katrin Roth, former director of human rights and respectful workplace at Vancouver Island University.

The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal did not allow a complaint from “K.R.” to proceed this summer, but she was given additional time to amend her complaint, according to a screening decision written by Diana Juricevic, tribunal chairwoman.

According to the decision, the complainant said she became aware in November 2016 that the harassment had been taking place over a two-year period.

“She describes that conduct as: sending sexually suggestive photos to women, writing in an ‘explicit, sexually exhibitionistic manner,’ following women to isolated areas, asking women out on dates repeatedly, leering and staring at women, and making women feel unsafe,” the decision noted. “She says there were instances where the student ‘pretended to seek routine services but then proceeded to surprise and involve non-consenting women in sexually arousing fantasies and role plays.’”

Juricevic wrote that the central allegations of K.R.’s complaint are that the university “failed to undertake a prompt, thorough and fair investigation or to follow its human rights and prevention of harassment policies and procedures,” but noted that the complaint “does not allege sufficient facts” and isn’t specific enough in identifying the women whose human rights are alleged to have been violated.

VIU responded to the Globe article on Monday with a statement released on behalf of Ralph Nilson, university president.

“We are … confident the university took appropriate and reasonable actions to respond to concerns that were raised and to protect the safety and well-being of our campus community,” Nilson wrote. “This matter was carefully and thoughtfully investigated by an experienced and legally trained external investigator who determined that actions of the university were reasonable.”

Nilson’s statement went on to disagree with Roth’s allegations as reported in the Globe article, saying that “due to privacy law, Ms. Roth has not been privy to all of the complexities at issue in this case, nor is she aware of all of the steps that were taken to investigate and respond to these concerns.”

Roth’s employment at the university was terminated in January 2017.

Melissa Stephens, the VIU Faculty Association’s status of women representative, wrote and released a statement Monday on social media condemning all forms of harassment.

“At a time when women, in particular, are speaking out against sexual violence and receiving backlash from people who question their credibility, VIUFA recognizes the personal and professional risks that survivors take when disclosing or reporting such information,” she wrote. “Our faculty should expect and promote a workplace culture in which survivors can be heard and believed … It is never acceptable to enable others to commit acts of sexual harassment in the workplace or elsewhere.”



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Free beach camps for kids

The Lake Windermere Ambassadors are offering free summer camps for kids at James Chabot Beach.

Fisher announces decision to run for MNBC regional director’s role

Debra Fisher plans to run for Region 4 director in the Métis Nation of B.C. election this fall

Traditional Indigenous languages evaluated for regional signage project

Economic Development Officer works toward inclusive signage project for the Columbia Valley

Sonshine Children’s Centre slates early-July reopening

Sonshine Children’s Centre plans to re-open for families in need on July 6.

Ktunaxa language nears extinction

UBC grad Martina Escutin has been raising awareness about the critically endangered Ktunaxa language

13 new B.C. COVID-19 cases, Langley Lodge outbreak ends

Health care outbreaks down to four, 162 cases active

Alberta health minister orders review into response after noose found in hospital in 2016

A piece of rope tied into a noose was found taped to the door of an operating room at the Grande Prairie Hospital in 2016

B.C.’s major rivers surge, sparking flood warnings

A persistent low pressure system over Alberta has led to several days of heavy rain

B.C.’s Indigenous rights law faces 2020 implementation deadline

Pipeline projects carry on as B.C. works on UN goals

Nelson cyclist run over by truck

Driver ticketed for failing to yield right of way on left turn

‘Mind boggling’: B.C. man $1 million richer after winning Lotto 6/49 a second time

David O’Brien hopes to use his winnings to travel and of course keep playing the lottery

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Lower Mainland teacher facing child pornography charges

Elazar Reshef, 52, has worked in the Delta School District

Most Read