Study aims to help women with painful periods

A B.C. woman is looking for others who may suffer from painful menstruation

  • Aug. 22, 2018 2:00 a.m.

Cramping, diarrhea, back pain and nausea, just a few symptoms of a menstrual cycle that women have to deal with every month.

If you are one of these women who battle painful periods, a North Okanagan thesis writer might be able to help.

Rebekah Johnson is looking for women who deal with painful periods for a research study that will investigate Osteopathic care on menstruation.

Osteopathy is a typically a branch of medical practice that emphasizes the treatment of medical disorders through the manipulation and massage of the bones, joints, and muscles.

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According to Johnson the therapy is aimed at improving the health and well-being of the whole person.

“The philosophy of Osteopathy is based on an understanding of the body as an interconnected whole which is capable of self-regulation and self-healing given that the proper conditions are present,” she said. “Osteopathic practitioners support the body’s inherent ability to auto-regulate and self-heal.”

Johnson explained that those who are willing to participate in the trial will have osteopathic practitioners take their personal history into account and then utilize techniques to support the body to improve circulation, reduce pain and increase functionality.

“Osteopaths take all of the body’s systems into account, including -but not limited to – the circulatory, neurological, musculoskeletal, hormonal and digestive systems,” said Johnson. “In approaching the body with this holistic understanding, Osteopathy acknowledges that the physical, mental and spiritual health are interconnected.”

After recently relocating to Vernon from Toronto, Johnson and her partner Travis Cuddington opened up North Okanagan Osteopathy.

“In order to complete my study in the seven year program, there is a research component in which I have been approved for,” she said.

She stated that there is no need for a doctor referral for Osteopathy and treatments or portions of treatments are covered under most extended health care plans.

For the current study Johnson is undertaking she said qualified participants are eligible for four free Osteopathic treatments.

Contact Johnson at rebekah@northokanaganosteopathy.ca or call 250-540-8683.

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