University of Victoria rocked by racist social media post

School president issues statement condemning the behaviour and says the matter is under investigation.

A racism scandal has hit the University of Victoria.

Days after university leaders announced an ambitious plan to foster and support Indigenous culture, the university is looking into social media posts where individuals, presumably students, are mocking First Nations.

A Snapchat screenshot shared on Facebook Sept. 16 showed young men pretending to get drunk off Lysol disinfectant wipes, captioned with a racist slur describing First Nations peoples using the cleaner in the same way.

University of Victoria president Jamie Cassels said in a Facebook post that the university has now identified people believed to be involved and are investigating the matter under the university’s policies on discrimination and harassment, and non-academic student misconduct.

“That such behaviour has taken place within our community is deeply concerning to university leaders and members, and is contrary to our commitment to an inclusive and respectful environment that provides a positive living, learning and working space for all,” said Cassels. “Yet we know that discriminatory and racist attitudes continue to exist, and this reinforces the importance of education and the responsibility of educational institutions to promote better understanding.”

Cassels went on to reaffirm UVic’s deep commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, to Indigenous students and creating more meaningful partnerships with Indigenous communities.

“We will not permit incidents like this to deflect our movement toward these important goals, but instead take them as proof of the need to redouble our efforts in the pursuit of reconciliation.”

Paul Marck, a spokesperson for the university, said there is nothing further to update beyond Cassels’ statement.

“There is no additional information to provide you,” he said. “Anything further related to investigations, outcomes and university policies are considered confidential processes.”

 

These images were shared to Facebook and are believed to be UVic students. (Facebook photo)

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