Caribou herds in B.C. are divided into four groups, southern mountain (shown), central mountain, northern mountain and boreal. (B.C. government)

LETTERS: Wolf kills, wilderness protection and caribou recovery

Readers respond to Tom Fletcher’s column on B.C. program

Re: Wolf kill, not backcountry bans, saving caribou (B.C. Views, Oct. 13)

Killing wolves has been the “white man’s way” since we invaded First Nations’ territories prior to and after 1867.

Wolves are predators, caribou are prey, but recent documentaries by researchers have shown wolves to have a beneficial impact on more than prey numbers. Their activity affects the environment in ways that short-sighted hunters and biologists could not perceive.

Those who study wolves probably have conflicting information than those who study caribou.

Patrick Longworth, Penticton

• • •

The mountain caribou saga drags on with each new attempt by a fresh batch of bio-miracle-workers determined to reverse the inevitable.

The animals are able to exist in areas where snow is deep and dense enough to support them as they go from one feeding site to the next in search of arboreal lichens that are their primary source of food in winter.

Deer, elk, moose, wolves and cougars do not occupy this environment in winter, while grizzly bears do, they are not a threat when hibernating.

This particular caribou subspecies are nivaphiles (snow-lovers) and able to exist where the others, being nivaphobes (snow-haters) cannot. Wolves do not follow snowmobile tracks because they don’t exist in the deep snow environment in winter!

Therefore, Conservation Officers are not protecting mountain caribou, but they are preventing riders from enjoying the “steep and the deep” under the pretext of protecting the environment.

Ken Sumanik MSc (Zoology), retired B.C. government big game and habitat biologist, Richmond

• • •

I almost spit my coffee out when I read the quote “Caribou are declining in Wells Gray Provincial Park….where there has been no modern-day industrial disturbance.” The Wells Gray caribou herd’s range extends far beyond Wells Gray park.

I just got back from an expedition to core critical habitat of the Wells Gray herd, where I found more than 500 CFL football fields being logged just outside the park. This logging began in April, within core critical habitat.

I don’t think it’s rocket science to understand that for a species to survive, they need habitat. Of course, putting them in a pen and killing their predators will probably achieve an increase in caribou numbers, but this is less like recovery and more like a zoo.

Recovery means self-sustaining populations, where human influence is not needed. The over-reliance on wolf culls and maternity pens without protecting sufficient habitat will never achieve self-sustaining populations in the long run.

I’ve also been to the habitat of the South Selkirk herd. The amount of linear disturbance and resource extraction is immense. Yes, there were backcountry signs saying something like “caribou habitat stay out.” These signs were covered in bullet holes and signs on top of the ministry signs that said “snowmobiling closure not the answer.” Followed by snowmobile tracks into habitat which was supposed to be off limits.

Charlotte Dawe, conservation campaigner, Wilderness Committee, Vancouver

BC legislature

Just Posted

Invermere gets new CAO

Invermere found his new CAO after a long period of research.

Radium council discusses short term rentals

RHS council are elaborating the second draft plan for STR

Beautification process begins in Canal Flats downtown

Canal Flats wants to improve the esthetic of the town

More consultation on LWRL to come this fall

Invermere council meeting discussed about the Athlamer neighbourhood plan

Local advocates for CBT climate change priority

Tracy Flynn ask the local government for action on climate change

B.C. or Ontario? Residential school survivors fight move of court battle

It’s now up to Ontario’s Court of Appeal to sort out the venue question

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Young B.C. cancer survivor rides 105-km with Terry Fox’s brother

Jacob Bredenhof and Darrell Fox’s cycling trek raises almost $90,000 for cancer research

B.C. migrant, undocumented workers rally for permanent residency program

Rally is part of the Amnesty for Undocumented Workers Campaign led by the Migrant Workers Centre

Preparations underway for pandemic election in Saskatchewan and maybe B.C.

Administrators in B.C. and around the country are also looking to expand voting by mail during the pandemic

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Nearly 20 per cent of COVID-19 infections among health-care workers by late July

WHO acknowledged the possibility that COVID-19 might be spread in the air under certain conditions

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

The court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington

Emaciated grizzly found dead on central B.C. coast as low salmon count sparks concern

Grizzly was found on Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw territory in Smith Inlet, 60K north of Port Hardy

Most Read