Canada captain Christine Sinclair (12) gathers her teammates for a huddle after England scored their second goal during first half FIFA Women’s World Cup quarter-final soccer action in Vancouver on June 27, 2015. Canada coach Kenneth Heiner-Moller learns his team’s road map Saturday at the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup in France at the tournament draw in Paris. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canadian women’s soccer team looks to follow Raptors’ path to glory

The soccer women have been following the basketball playoffs from France,

The Canadian women’s soccer team hopes to build on the Toronto Raptors’ NBA championship triumph by making some history of its own at the World Cup.

The soccer women have been following the basketball playoffs from France, which hasn’t been easy given the six-hour time difference with Toronto and nine hours with Oakland, Calif. The visiting Raptors captured the championship with a 114-110 win over the Golden State Warriors in Game 6 on Thursday.

ALSO READ: U.S. women’s team slammed for excessive goal celebration at World Cup

“If you saw Kadeisha’s goal celebration it was basketball-themed,” veteran midfielder Sophie Schmidt of Abbotsford, told a news conference in Grenoble on Friday, referencing Kadeisha Buchanan’s goal in the 1-0 win over No. 46 Cameroon last Monday on Montpellier. “We’re very excited for the Raptors. It’s massive for Canada.

“I’m not sure if anybody woke up at 3 a.m. to watch the game (Thursday) … But first thing we did when we woke up was check our phones. That’s massive for Canada and we’re hoping to get the result (Saturday against No. 19 New Zealand) and have another success story for Canadians to celebrate.”

It’s a measure of the penetration of the Raptors’ success that the basketball question came from a BBC World Service reporter rather than a Canadian journalist travelling with the fifth-ranked team.

Buchanan, a 23-year-old from Brampton, Ont., who plays her club soccer for European champion Lyon, is a huge Raptors fan. After a solo celebration following her headed goal against Cameroon, a group of the Canadian players gathered up and Buchanan fired an imaginary basketball into an imaginary hoop held by fullback Allysha Chapman.

Neil Davidson, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Latest round of Columbia River Treaty talks wrap up

It was the first oppportunity for local Indigenous Nations to participate as observers

Fatal car crash near Radium

RCMP suspect ‘medical emergency’ caused single-vehicle incident

“Dirt fishing” unearths long-lost memento

Man uncovers 30-year-old lost class ring at old Invermere high school grounds

Studying time management

DTSS school schedule to change this fall

Sparking the ignition on electric carshare program

Wildsight seeks sponsorship for EV carshare program ‘Spark’

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Heroism medal for B.C. woman who tried to save wheelchair-bound man stuck on rail tracks

Julie Callaghan awarded Carnegie Medal from U.S.-based foundation for ‘extraordinary heroism’

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

B.C. students’ camping trip goes ahead despite tents getting stolen

Nanaimo businesses, school staff and parents ensure trip goes on

Disaster relief: four tips for coping with wildfires, smoky skies

Being shrouded in smoke or having to flee from wildfires can cause anxiety, stress, depression

Only legal pot shop between Vancouver and Kamloops now open

Private cannabis store on Skwah land in Chilliwack is first B.C. licensee to be Indigenous owned

Canadian communities responding to climate change

New research highlights state of local adaptation planning in Canada

Victoria woman in L.A. hospital after she was run over twice

Lynn Phillips has suffered from multiple broken bones and internal bleeding

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

Most Read