Nordic skiing in Fernie, BC

First-time skier or veteran, find fun and fitness here!

Fernie’s Nordic ski trails offer plenty of opportunities to warm up and enjoy a healthy cardio workout with skate and classic ski options.

Or take a moment to appreciate the peace and quiet that the valley has to offer.

From a first-time skier to a veteran, classic or skate, getting out on some corduroy shouldn’t be a problem. More than 15 kilometres of trails are professionally cared for by the Fernie Nordic Society. Trail conditions and grooming updates can be found at fernienordic.com.

Elk Valley Nordic Centre

From downtown Fernie, follow Highway 3 south, turn right on Mt. Fernie Park Rd. The main parking lot is at Mount Fernie Provincial Park.

Trails are of varying difficulty, “green” to “black,” with a growing trail network of over nine kilometres. The trails were professionally designed for Nordic skiing. Recent work on the trail network and at the staging area should allow for early season skiing and excellent late-season conditions. The Elk Valley Nordic Centre recently completed a warming hut that is located at the trailhead. When on duty, a trail ambassador can help you plan a route. Maps and information on the network are also available.

Fernie Golf Club

Located in Fernie, this network is easy to access. From downtown Fernie head north along Highway 3, turn right on 15th Street, left on 6th Avenue and then right on Fairway Drive. Fairway Drive ends at the Fernie Golf Club (FGC) clubhouse.

More than 12 kilometres of groomed track loop through open terrain and forests. This network is ideal for new skiers or those seeking limited elevation, with trails groomed by both the FGC and the Fernie Nordic Society.

The Fernie City Ski Shuttle stops at the Mountain High Adventures yurt and cafe where snowshoes, fat bikes, snowmobiles and Nordic skis (including youth sizes) are available to rent.

Montane Nordic & Multi-Use Trails

From downtown Fernie, take Pine Avenue to Coal Creek Road. A turn around is located on the right-hand side of the road. This is one of the main access points for the Montane network.

This network is extensive, but only 10 kilometres of trails are groomed. Groomed trails are rated as “green” in difficulty. The network offers varying terrain from open trails to more challenging forested trails. Some trails will lead skiers to the Castle Mountain network. A warming hut is located on the far end (four kilometres) of the trail network.

Note: Many of the trails in this network are non-motorized multi-use, therefore fat bikes, snowshoes and dogs may also be seen in the area. As these are not Nordic-specific trails be sure to watch for traffic!

Fernie Alpine Resort

Follow Highway 3 south from Fernie and turn right on Fernie Ski Hill Road. The road will take skiers to the main village. Nordic skiing starts at parking lot 4.

Fourteen kilometres of groomed and track-set trails await. The trails range from beginner to intermediate for both disciplines. Lessons and rentals are available at the resort village, along with all the vacation amenities needed.

Island Lake Cat Skiing

From downtown Fernie follow Highway 3 south, turn right on Mt. Fernie Park Road and the road will lead skiers to Island Lake’s parking lot. Call ahead for reservations 250-423-3700

Several kilometres of groomed trails await skiers. Trail difficulty varies; beginner terrain can be found for four kilometres. At the Cedar Trail sign, the trails get more difficult and are recommended for advanced skiers. Rentals are available to guests and are free with a night’s stay.

Note: Many of the trails in this network are non-motorized multi-use. Fatbikes, snowshoes, and dogs may also be seen in the area. Watch for traffic!

While many facilities are closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, plan for future adventures throughout the West Coast at westcoasttraveller.com.

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